A Journey to Adafus Follow story

nate_wynt Nate Wynt

An elder poet living out the rest of his days in his village goes in a flurry when a strange letter comes into his possession. Upon reading its contents he immediately sets out of his village to the lost city of Adafus. He quests on this journey to reinvigorate the people of the towns struck by the primordial entity known as the Lich. With the seal containing this depraved deity weakened, it is his task to reseal it to prevent the downfall of his country and eventually the world. Join him on his long trek through the country as he collects and shares his poetry to give the people hope and strength to resist the influence of the Lich. 


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#mystery #journey #fantasy #love #drama #poetry #poet #sliceoflife #prose #adventure
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A New Journey, Onward to the Road

Starting in the early morrow, as the sun had not yet risen, stepped a foot outside the burrow, and glanced at sunrise early prism. T’was a foxling from tunnel now emerging, garbed in petty hat and smile, turned its eye to form approaching, to it ran forward along a file. Jumped and tackled form of aging, foxling nuzzled and chewed and gnawed, the man had laughed now joking, that his shoe the fox did maraud. “Whoa there Lassie, watch where you’re biting”, said the man with no appall, orange fiend then stopped and nodded, nodded now and licked his paw. The form of man attired in purple, placed his hand along his maw, pondered carefully till his brain did gurgle, said to himself and fox-in-law. “Methinks is time for us to go hither, hither to our journey now, my business is set I am not tethered, tethered to this town of folk and cow.” To continue from where he’d stopped his message, he bent and in arms took fox, and embracing it within his bondage, said “Now we shall venture outside our box!”

On the soil of earth was placed, and began the fox its tail did chase, the bearded man turned and faced, his town of once gentle grace. Perhaps it was some empathy cruel, that made his heart wrench just a little, and he conjured an excuse, a need for fuel, and so he and fox went to store to roost. At first was joking about the fuel, but remembered he had packed no food, but then remembered he had a jewel, one which would set a mood. He took it out, the last of his treasures, and placed it on the store owners tab, he, with regret had no measure, of knowing what response he’d have. “No, I ain’t accepting your jewel, I have not enough coin for change, what did you take me a fool? With my fist your face will rearrange.” And so the man who was big and burly, muscles popping from his chest, grabbed the old man’s beard (which was not curly), and told him he was no pawn of test. With his pride in pieces he picked up, that right now he should go, he rushed outside with his pup, and cursed the man with quite the show. On the stone road through the square, the man did go to by some books to read, for his journey would be quite unfair, if he had not an article to feed. “Madam, perhaps by chance I might have a book? I have only a jewel in my name. I take you for no fool but I am a cook, and for a book shall equal a meal the same.” Said the old man to the ravishing young lady. “No, I think not, for you are the crooked old man, the most abhorring of the elderly, now shoo before upon your face I lay my hand!”

The old man was shocked, and honestly quite sad, for before he never knew the hatred that they had. For him, the man that helped raise them from birth, anyone under the year of 30 should know him by grandfather. From him, no woman gave birth, and so he tried to be their grandfather. Along he got up from a step of stone, from the fountain spewing song, and to all the shops in town he’d known, and all of them did treat him wrong. They kicked him out and would rave that he was always mean. They would badger him and implore, that he was never a part of their team. Distraught that all the old and young, would do that to his face. The old man packed what little he had and clicked his tongue, and then headed to the town gate to part their ways. His tiny fox was just behind him, playing with its tail, and at the gate where he would swim, into a world of hail. And as he was about to set, his foot outside the gate, he jumped in surprise at a scream that told him “Hey old man! Wait!” T’was the people of the village, and all those who owned the stores, they came with goods he would have pillaged, if only it wouldn’t have been a chore.

From the baker, to the mason, from the tailor, to the random person, all of them had met. And at the gate, did they congregate, and gifted him with their best. “What manner of trickery do I perceive, from those who would run me away? Who am I to openly believe, you’d come to forgive in less than a day?” Said the Oldman as he swept his fingers through his beard, the townsfolk people clicked their tongues, as he too their meanings worse than feared. The first to come was the maiden, the one who gave no books to read, she sighed and told him she was sorry, but her words did he not heed. To him she gifted two books departed, from the heart of her bookstore. One was empty, the other gleamed, as the Oldman’s eyes through his glasses bore. “What… I don’t understand, from the time today we met, you threatened with your hand.” He said in confusion not at all upset. But before she could answer, there came in the a man with heavy feet. He lumbered through the crowd unlike a dancer, and said “Here’s some salted meat…”. T’was the butcher of which he went, the one who lacked the coin, and when raised, his eyebrow bent, as he inspected his eyes upon the loin. “Was not my intention to give you threat, t’was just the fact that I was mad. Mad not at you for wanting left, but that you’d give the jewel you had.” Again the old man pondered weary, of what it was the giant said, but before his brain grew dreary, the pastor came and graced his head. Then the merchant, then the farmer, then the urchin, then the breeder.

All of them around the village, had come to give him grace, he had just the strength to manage, but then relief had struck his face. And finally came the towns McGuffin, with a hay straw in his mouth. He sighed and then started chuckling, as he was the only to give without. But with his words were truths imparted, and the elder knew this too, and with his final words departed, only then the Oldman knew. “You’ve been the grandfather to most us folks, but when we were kids and with your jewel we once departed. We all meant jokes, but you gave lecture broken-hearted. We know how much you love your stone, and it would sadden me, and all of us who has known, what the gem did mean. Apologies for our conduct, for we did it from our love, and a tear shall form from our tear ducts, as from this town of us you’ll shove. So goodbye grandfather that we’ve known, goodbye for all your time, goodbye old man from his home, depart from us to record your rhymes.” and with his hat he then did nod, and the Oldman’s eyes did gleam. The towns folk laughed and then watched him trod, with the fox on left, they left as team.  

July 29, 2017, 6:42 p.m. 0 Comments Report Embed 0
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